Mark Harrop Business Development Manager

Mar 23
2017

Digital savvy Brits more likely to disengage, unless engaging technology is used,

Recent American research reveals that UK consumers are among those most prone to switch brands due to poor digital customer engagement. Contact centre technology expert Aquarium Software concludes that customers now expect a more personal service than ever before, especially in the digital space. Far from this being at odds with the deployment of volume process technologies, Aquarium believes that the right technology has a vital role to play in underpinning customer service and retention.

The same study finds that globally, customers who prefer digital channels of communication to human engagement are the most likely to switch brands or service providers. Aquarium Software believes that only those offering a seamless customer journey through the channel of the individual customer’s choice, can hope to avoid significant churn and reducing profits.

“My colleagues and I at Aquarium have been talking about this subject for a long time and warning our clients and contact centres in particular of the dangers of what we term ‘comms complacency’,” said Ed Shropshire, Managing Director of Aquarium Software. “Adopting a customer-centric mindset and delivering a seamless, personalised experience via all communication channels is now a must, regardless of the industry.”

Ed argues that finding customers are more likely to ‘stay’ if they receive a personal service should not come as a surprise to anyone. The challenge for contact centres is to make all forms of communication and digital engagement in particular much more personal, less complacent and more consistent. So how do you manage that if you are dealing with millions of monthly or weekly customer contact points? As the technology is now readily available to do this, contact centres have no one to blame but themselves if they are failing in this respect.

YouGov research commissioned by Aquarium Software in 2016 shows that 78 per cent of Brits prefer talking to contact centre staff based in the country they live in, and this US research supports the view. Rather than representing a xenophobic response, the findings illustrate a plea for a genuinely personal service. They are also a warning that businesses not delivering a bespoke service, particularly in digital communications, are likely to pay a price in terms of their long-term customer retention prospects. “The key word here is genuine,” added Ed. “Put yourself in the position of the customer passed around several times, and having to explain themselves each time they speak to someone new, or turning to social media and not receiving a joined up response. Fake sincerity is doomed to fail and only a holistic fully ‘joined up’ approach can deliver consistent customer service.”